Seminarthemen der Wirtschaftsinformatik-Lehrstühle

(Sprache: english) IIS-MA-1

Analyzing Psychophysiological Methods as Means to Measure the Impact of Digital Nudges on Users

Digital Nudging has by now received a lot of attention and is researched under several aspects. However, so far there has not been much attention paid to measuring the effects of digital nudges on users. While traditional, performance-related methods would focus on asking the user or observing the user’s click behavior, there are some methods which might provide deeper insights into underlying psychological processes of the observed behavior.

Therefore, the focus of this seminar paper is to analyze impact of digital nudges on the one hand, and psychophysiological methods to measure this on the other.

Literatur

  • Terres, P., Klumpe, J., Jung, D., Koch, O., 2019. Digital nudges for user onboarding: Turning visitors into users. Proc. 27th Eur. Conf. Inf. Syst. 0–16.
  • Thaler, R. H., & Sunstein, C. R. (2008). Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth and Happiness. Yale University Press.
  • Weinmann, M., Schneider, C., Brocke, J. vom, 2016. Digital Nudging. Bus. Inf. Syst. Eng. 58, 433–436.
  • Mirsch, T., Lehrer, C., Jung, R., 2017. Digital Nudging: Altering User Behavior in Digital Environments. Proc. 13th Int. Conf. Wirtschaftsinformatik. 634–648.
  • Riedl, R., Fischer, T., Léger, P.-M., 2017. A Decade of NeuroIS Research: Status Quo, Challenges, and Future Directions, in: ICIS. South Korea.

(Sprache: english) IIS-MA-2

Is website design really that important? Analyzing the impact of brand perception on ecommerce websites

When focusing on website design and user experiences on websites, the main aim is typically to enhance the aesthetic perception and usability of the provided website. However, in other contexts, the brand that sells the product also influences our decision-making processes. In the information systems research community, however, the brand influence on website perception is often neglected. 

Therefore, this seminar paper aims to explore and analyze the impact of website brand on the overall website perception.

Literatur

  • Ghafoor, H., Shakil Ahmed, S., Naeem, M.M., Huang, C., 2018. Analysis of Brand Perception Effect on Store Image and Purchase Intention of Customers A Study on Apparel Clothing. Int. J. Sci. Eng. Res. 9, 1324–1330.
  • Erdil, T.S., 2015. Effects of Customer Brand Perceptions on Store Image and Purchase Intention: An Application in Apparel Clothing. Procedia - Soc. Behav. Sci. 207, 196–205.

(Sprache: english) IIS-MA-3

Analyse des Product Goal in Scrum zur Identifizierung des IT Business Values

Eine weitere Veränderung ist die Einführung eines Product Goal. Das Product Goal soll das Scrum-Team auf ein größeres, wertvolles Ziel ausrichten. Jeder Sprint sollte das Produkt näher an das übergeordnete Ziel heranbringen. Bereits in vorherigen Versionen wurde der Wert des Produktes immer betont, allerdings soll es nun mit dem Product Goal noch transparenter werden. Ziel dieser Seminararbeit ist es, dass neue Commitment-Ziel näher zu erläutern und die Auswirkungen auf den bisherigen Scrum-Prozess darzustellen. Darüber hinaus soll analysiert werden, inwiefern das Product Goal die Identifizierung des IT Business Values der IT-Investition unterstützen kann. 

Literatur

  • Beck, K. et al. (2001). Manifesto for Agile Software Development. Retrieved on December 7, 2006 from agilemanifesto.org
  • Habermann, F. (2013). Hybrides Projektmanagement—agile und klassische Vorgehensmodelle im Zusammenspiel. HMD Praxis der Wirtschaftsinformatik, 50(5), 93-102.
  • Schwaber, K., & Sutherland, J. (2020). The scrum guide. Scrum Alliance.

(Sprache: english) IIS-MA-4

On-Shelf Availability Prediction using Real-Time-generated Sales Data

In this work, On-Shelf Availability is modelled as a density estimation problem. Using data simulated as if collected through a sales and inventory management system, an article shall be assigned a value that represents the probability of being available on the shelf. 

It is expected to implement a single approach to solve the problem at hand, drawing on classical or adaptions of classical parametric or non-parametric densities, and evaluate its prediction quality measured by a self-defined, purposeful metric. A simple simulation model is to be developed and applied in order to sample ground-truth data.

Students might consider publishing their work to a domain-oriented academic conference after the finished grading process, and open-source their work on GitHub.

Literatur

  • Friedman, J., Hastie, T., & Tibshirani, R. (2001). The elements of statistical learning (Vol. 1, No. 10). New York: Springer series in statistics.
  • Laptev, N., Amizadeh, S., & Flint, I. (2015, August). Generic and scalable framework for automated time-series anomaly detection. In Proceedings of the 21th ACM SIGKDD international conference on knowledge discovery and data mining (pp. 1939-1947).
  • Silverman, B. W. (1986). Density estimation for statistics and data analysis (Vol. 26). CRC press.
  • Corsten, D., & Gruen, T. (2003). Desperately seeking shelf availability: an examination of the extent, the causes, and the efforts to address retail outofstocks. International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management.

(Sprache: deutsch/englisch) IIS-MA-5

Process Mining als eine Möglichkeit zur Wirkungsermittlung für den IT Business Value

Process-Mining-Werkzeuge, die eine automatische Konstruktion und Analyse von Prozessen ermöglichen, sind bereits seit Anfang der 2000er-Jahre entstanden. Diese Werkzeuge wie beispielsweise Celonis helfen dabei Analysen durchzuführen, um Problembereiche in den Prozessen bzw. der gesamten Organisation aufzudecken und dadurch dann auch Ansatzpunkte für mögliche Prozessverbesserungen zu identifizieren. Anhand von Prozessmodellen kann dabei die Reihenfolge der Aktivitäten bestimmt, die beteiligten Organisationseinheiten bzw. auch die Rollen der Mitarbeiter erkannt, die Dauer einer Aktivität gemessen oder auch die Prozessschritte zu Ergebnissen zugeordnet werden. In dieser Seminararbeit soll untersucht werden, wie das Process Mining im Rahmen der Wirkungsermittlung für den IT Business Value eingesetzt werden kann.

Literatur

  • Van der Aalst, W. M. P. (2011): Process Mining. Berlin: Springer.
  • Peters, R.; Nauroth, M. (2019): Process-Mining. Geschäftsprozesse: Smart, schnell und einfach. Wiesbaden: Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden.
  • Schütte, R.; Seufert, S.; Wulfert, T. (2019): Das Wertbeitragscontrolling als Anreicherung bestehender Vorgehensmodelle des Software Engineering. In: Lecture Notes der GI, S. 111-126.

(Sprache: english) SITM-MA-1

Requirements for Technical Systems from a User Perspective and their Transfer to Smart Sustainable Cities

Within information systems there is extensive literature on topics of user requirements, expectations and acceptance, for example, the technology acceptance model (TAM). The question that arises is, how far it is possible to relate models from this field to the partially technical system of a Smart Sustainable City. Which factors remain, which have to be reconsidered? The student could check the available considerations and models for their usability in an urban context. This would be done, for example, by means of a comparative literature analysis based on which an initial system for transferring the existing models to the changed context could be developed.

Literatur

  • An experimental study on the role of touch in shared virtual environments. In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (TOCHI).
  • Burmester, Michael; Mast, Marcus; Jäger, Kilian; Homans, Hendrik (2010): Valence method for formative evaluation of user experience. In: Kim Halskov (Hg.): Poceedings of the 8th ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems. DIS 2010 ; Aarhus, Denmark, 16 - 20 August 2010. the 8th ACM Conference. Aarhus, Denmark, 8/16/2010 - 8/20/2010. Association for Computing Machinery; Conference on Designing Interactive Systems; DIS. New York, NY: ACM, S. 364.
  • Cowley, Ben; Charles, Darryl; Black, Michaela; Hickey, Ray (2006): User-System-Experience Model for User Centered Design in Computer Games. In: Vincent P. Wade, Helen Ashman und Barry Smyth (Hg.): Adaptive Hypermedia and Adaptive Web-Based Systems. 4th International Conference, AH 2006, Dublin, Ireland, June 21-23, 2006. Proceedings. Berlin, Heidelberg, 2006. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg (Information Systems and Applications, incl. Internet/Web, and HCI), S. 419–424.
  • Engl, Stephan; Nacke, Lennart E. (2013): Contextual influences on mobile player experience – A game user experience model. In: Entertainment Computing 4 (1), S. 83–91. DOI: 10.1016/j.entcom.2012.06.001.
  • Gabbard, J. L.; Hix, D.; Swan, J. E. (1999): User-centered design and evaluation of virtual environments. In: IEEE Comput. Grap. Appl. 19 (6), S. 51–59. DOI: 10.1109/38.799740.
  • Halskov, Kim (Hg.) (2010): Poceedings of the 8th ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems. DIS 2010 ; Aarhus, Denmark, 16 - 20 August 2010. the 8th ACM Conference. Aarhus, Denmark, 8/16/2010 - 8/20/2010. Association for Computing Machinery; Conference on Designing Interactive Systems; DIS. New York, NY: ACM.
  • Han, Dai-In; tom Dieck, M. Claudia; Jung, Timothy (2018): User experience model for augmented reality applications in urban heritage tourism. In: Journal of Heritage Tourism 13 (1), S. 46–61. DOI: 10.1080/1743873X.2016.1251931.
  • Ping Zhang, Gisela M. von Dran (2001): User Expectations and Rankings of Quality Factors in Different Web Site Domains. In: International Journal of Electronic Commerce 6 (2), S. 9–33. DOI: 10.1080/10864415.2001.11044237.
  • Ryker, Randy; Nath, Ravinder; Henson, James (1997): Determinants of computer user expectations and their relationships with user satisfaction: An empirical study. In: Information Processing & Management 33 (4), S. 529–537. DOI: 10.1016/S0306-4573(97)00016-2.
  • Szajna, Bernadette; Scamell, Richard W. (1993): The Effects of Information System User Expectations on Their Performance and Perceptions. In: MIS Quarterly 17 (4), S. 493. DOI: 10.2307/249589.
  • Wade, Vincent P.; Ashman, Helen; Smyth, Barry (Hg.) (2006): Adaptive Hypermedia and Adaptive Web-Based Systems. 4th International Conference, AH 2006, Dublin, Ireland, June 21-23, 2006. Proceedings. Berlin, Heidelberg, 2006. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg (Information Systems and Applications, incl. Internet/Web, and HCI).

(Sprache: english) SITM-MA-2

The Role of Enterprise Architecture Principles in Smart Cities

A growing number of cities become involved in self-styled smart city initiatives. These initiatives apply various information and communications technologies in order to improve a city’s economic efficiency and sustainability while increasing its citizens’ quality of life. This may make the cities more attractive for citizens and companies but require significant investments over many years. Smart city initiatives face a variety of digitalization challenges, for instance, those related to e-government, digital infrastructure, Internet of Things (IoT) development and adoption, information system (IS) security, resource-efficient innovation, and involvement of citizens and other stakeholders in digitalizing their cities. Although SC initiatives are characterized by unique challenges resulting from their multidimensionality and thus high complexity (Campbell, McDonald and Sethibe, 2010, p. 13; Ojo, Curry and Janowski, 2014, p. 2), an SC shares some characteristics with the concept of the enterprise.

Enterprise architecture (EA) principles are one of the key aspects of EA and has been extensively used especially in large organizations. Arguably, such EA architecture principles can be seen as a type of control and coordination mechanisms meant to aid the organization to reach its goals. The EA literature has established reasonably well that an organization should particularly consider its strategic and business goals in developing an EA (Ahlemann et al., 2012, p. 20). According to Greefhorst and Proper (Greefhorst and Proper, 2011), principles can be seen as the cornerstones of EA, as they fill the gap between high-level strategic intent and concrete design. Thus, one could argue that it is more fruitful for an SC initiative to focus first on the process of developing EA principles, and subsequently EA organizational structures, to increase the chances of the EA properly fitting the characteristics of the city, its stakeholders, and their goals. 

The goal of this seminar thesis is to examine the state of the art of enterprise architecture principles (in general) and to compare this understanding of architecture principles with the needs of SC initiatives, so as to examine the potential value of and obstacles to using such principles in SC. One potential research approach is thus a structured literature review and a critical analysis of the collected papers.

Literatur

  • Ahlemann, F., E. Stettiner, M. Messerschmidt and C. Legner. (2012). Strategic Enterprise Architecture Management: Challenges, Best Practices, and Future Developments. Berlin ; New York: Springer.
  • Aier, S., C. Riege and R. Winter. (2008). “Unternehmensarchitektur – Literaturüberblick und Stand der Praxis.” Wirtschaftsinformatik, 50(4), 292–304.
  • Alawadhi, S., A. Aldama-Nalda, H. Chourabi, J. R. Gil-Garcia, S. Leung, S. Mellouli, … S. Walker. (2012). “Building Understanding of Smart City Initiatives.” In: Electronic Government (pp. 40–53). Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg.
  • Albino, V., U. Berardi and R. M. Dangelico. (2015). “Smart Cities: Definitions, Dimensions, Per-formance, and Initiatives.” Journal of Urban Technology, 22(1), 3–21.
  • Anthopoulos, L. and P. Fitsilis. (2014). “Exploring architectural and organizational features in smart cities.” In: 16th International Conference on Advanced Communication Technology (pp. 190–195).
  • Anthopoulos, Leonidas. (2015). “Defining smart city architecture for sustainability.” In: Proceedings of 14th Electronic Government and 7th Electronic Participation Conference (IFIP2015) (pp. 140–147).
  • Bastidas, V., M. Bezbradica and M. Helfert. (2017). “Cities as enterprises: a comparison of smart city frameworks based on enterprise architecture requirements.” In: International Conference on Smart Cities (pp. 20–28). Springer.
  • Bawany, N. Z. and J. A. Shamsi. (2015). “Smart City Architecture: Vision and Challenges,” 6(11), 246–255.
  • Brown, M. M. and J. L. Brudney. (1998). “Public Sector Information Technology Initiatives: Impli-cations for Programs of Public Administration.” Administration & Society, 30(4), 421–442.
  • Campbell, J., C. McDonald and T. Sethibe. (2010). “Public and private sector IT governance: Identifying contextual differences.” Australasian Journal of Information Systems, 16(2).
  • Chourabi, H., T. Nam, S. Walker, J. R. Gil-Garcia, S. Mellouli, K. Nahon, … H. J. Scholl. (2012). “Understanding Smart Cities: An Integrative Framework” (pp. 2289–2297). Presented at the Ha-waii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), IEEE.
  • Greefhorst, D., H. Koning and H. van Vliet. (2006). “The many faces of architectural descriptions.” Information Systems Frontiers, 8(2), 103–113.
  • Greefhorst, D. and E. Proper. (2011). Architecture Principles: The Cornerstones of Enterprise Archi-tecture. Springer Science & Business Media.
  • Iyer, B., D. Dreyfus and P. Gyllstrom. (2007). “A Network-Based View of Enterprise Architecture.” In: P. Saha (Ed.), Handbook of Enterprise Systems Architecture in Practice.
  • Mamkaitis, A., M. Bezbradica and M. Helfert. (2016a). “Urban enterprise: A review of Smart City frameworks from an Enterprise Architecture perspective.” In: 2016 IEEE International Smart Cit-ies Conference (ISC2) (pp. 1–5).
  • Mamkaitis, A., M. Bezbradica and M. Helfert. (2016b). “Urban Enterprise Principles development approach: a case from a European City.” In: Thirty Seventh International Conference on Infor-mation Systems (p. 9). Dublin, Ireland.
  • Matthes, D. (2011). Enterprise Architecture Frameworks Kompendium. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
  • Nam, T. and T. A. Pardo. (2011a). “Conceptualizing Smart City with Dimensions of Technology, People, and Institutions.” In: Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Digital Government Research Conference: Digital Government Innovation in Challenging Times (pp. 282–291). New York, NY, USA: ACM.
  • Nam, T. and T. A. Pardo. (2011b). “Smart city as urban innovation: Focusing on management, policy, and context.” In: Proceedings of the 5th international conference on theory and practice of electronic governance (pp. 185–194). Washington, DC: ACM.
  • Ojo, A., E. Curry and T. Janowski. (2014). “Designing next Generation Smart City Initiatives - Harnessing Findings and Lessons from a Study of Ten Smart City Programs.” In: ECIS 2014 Pro-ceedings (p. 15). Tel Aviv.
  • Richardson, G. L., B. M. Jackson and G. W. Dickson. (1990). “A principles-based enterprise archi-tecture: Lessons from Texaco and Star enterprise.” MIS Quarterly, 14(4), 385–403.
  • Sethibe, T., J. Campbell and C. McDonald. (2007). “IT governance in public and private sector organisations: examining the differences and defining future research directions.” ACIS 2007 Pro-ceedings, 118.
  • Winter, R. (2014). “Architectural Thinking.” Business & Information Systems Engineering, 6(6), 361–364.
  • Alawadhi, S., & Scholl, H. J. (2016). Smart Governance: A Cross-Case Analysis of Smart City Initiatives. In 2016 49th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS) (pp. 2953–2963). Koloa, HI, USA: IEEE. doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2016.370

(Sprache: english) SITM-MA-3

Understanding the Role of Enterprise Architecture in Smart Cities: An Overview of Architecture Frameworks and their Uses

A growing number of cities become involved in self-styled smart city initiatives. These initiatives apply various information and communications technologies in order to improve a city’s economic efficiency and sustainability while increasing its citizens’ quality of life. This may make the cities more attractive for citizens and companies but require significant investments over many years. Smart city initiatives face a variety of digitalization challenges, for instance, those related to e-government, digital infrastructure, Internet of Things (IoT) development and adoption, information system (IS) security, resource-efficient innovation, and involvement of citizens and other stakeholders in digitalizing their cities. Although SC initiatives are characterized by unique challenges resulting from their multidimensionality and thus high complexity (Campbell, McDonald and Sethibe, 2010, p. 13; Ojo, Curry and Janowski, 2014, p. 2), an SC shares some characteristics with the concept of the enterprise.

In order to address these challenges, researchers have proposed several frameworks to describe SC architectures. Some works are based on the assumption that the enterprise concept can be transferred to an SC, and thus they propose that enterprise architecture management (EAM) approaches could direct and guide a city’s digital transformation (Mamkaitis et al., 2016a, p. 1; Bastidas, Bezbradica and Helfert, 2017, p. 1). EAM, in this context, can be understood as a management practice that “establishes, maintains and uses a coherent set of guidelines, architecture principles and governance regimes that provide direction for and practical help with the design and development of an enterprise’s architecture in order to achieve its vision and strategy” (Ahlemann, Stettiner, Messerschmidt and Legner, 2012, p. 20). As such, an enterprise architecture (EA) fundamentally describes the structures of an enterprise and follows the idea of modelling the enterprise’s most important artefacts and its relationships including principles (Aier, Riege and Winter, 2008, p. 292). Due to the unique challenges of SCs, researchers and practitioners have proposed various types of EA for SCs, some of which are extended from generic EA frameworks  (Anthopoulos and Fitsilis, 2014, p. 192; Bawany and Shamsi, 2015; Anthopoulos, 2015; Mamkaitis et al., 2016b, 2016a). 

The goal of this seminar thesis is to examine the enterprise architectures and related EA frameworks for smart cities. The seminar thesis should provide an overview and analysis (for instance a classification) of these SC architectures and architecture frameworks in relation to the needs of SC initiatives. One potential research approach is thus a structured literature review and a critical analysis of the collected papers.

Literatur

  • Ahlemann, F., E. Stettiner, M. Messerschmidt and C. Legner. (2012). Strategic Enterprise Architecture Management: Challenges, Best Practices, and Future Developments. Berlin ; New York: Springer.
  • Aier, S., C. Riege and R. Winter. (2008). “Unternehmensarchitektur – Literaturüberblick und Stand der Praxis.” Wirtschaftsinformatik, 50(4), 292–304.
  • Alawadhi, S., A. Aldama-Nalda, H. Chourabi, J. R. Gil-Garcia, S. Leung, S. Mellouli, … S. Walker. (2012). “Building Understanding of Smart City Initiatives.” In: Electronic Government (pp. 40–53). Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg.
  • Albino, V., U. Berardi and R. M. Dangelico. (2015). “Smart Cities: Definitions, Dimensions, Performance, and Initiatives.” Journal of Urban Technology, 22(1), 3–21.
  • Anthopoulos, L. and P. Fitsilis. (2014). “Exploring architectural and organizational features in smart cities.” In: 16th International Conference on Advanced Communication Technology (pp. 190–195).
  • Anthopoulos, Leonidas. (2015). “Defining smart city architecture for sustainability.” In: Proceedings of 14th Electronic Government and 7th Electronic Participation Conference (IFIP2015) (pp. 140–147).
  • Bastidas, V., M. Bezbradica and M. Helfert. (2017). “Cities as enterprises: a comparison of smart city frameworks based on enterprise architecture requirements.” In: International Conference on Smart Cities (pp. 20–28). Springer.
  • Bawany, N. Z. and J. A. Shamsi. (2015). “Smart City Architecture: Vision and Challenges,” 6(11), 246–255.
  • Brown, M. M. and J. L. Brudney. (1998). “Public Sector Information Technology Initiatives: Impli-cations for Programs of Public Administration.” Administration & Society, 30(4), 421–442.
  • Campbell, J., C. McDonald and T. Sethibe. (2010). “Public and private sector IT governance: Identifying contextual differences.” Australasian Journal of Information Systems, 16(2).
  • Chourabi, H., T. Nam, S. Walker, J. R. Gil-Garcia, S. Mellouli, K. Nahon, … H. J. Scholl. (2012). “Understanding Smart Cities: An Integrative Framework” (pp. 2289–2297). Presented at the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS), IEEE.
  • Greefhorst, D., H. Koning and H. van Vliet. (2006). “The many faces of architectural descriptions.” Information Systems Frontiers, 8(2), 103–113.
  • Greefhorst, D. and E. Proper. (2011). Architecture Principles: The Cornerstones of Enterprise Archi-tecture. Springer Science & Business Media.
  • Iyer, B., D. Dreyfus and P. Gyllstrom. (2007). “A Network-Based View of Enterprise Architecture.” In: P. Saha (Ed.), Handbook of Enterprise Systems Architecture in Practice.
  • Mamkaitis, A., M. Bezbradica and M. Helfert. (2016a). “Urban enterprise: A review of Smart City frameworks from an Enterprise Architecture perspective.” In: 2016 IEEE International Smart Cit-ies Conference (ISC2) (pp. 1–5).
  • Mamkaitis, A., M. Bezbradica and M. Helfert. (2016b). “Urban Enterprise Principles development approach: a case from a European City.” In: Thirty Seventh International Conference on Information Systems (p. 9). Dublin, Ireland.
  • Matthes, D. (2011). Enterprise Architecture Frameworks Kompendium. Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
  • Nam, T. and T. A. Pardo. (2011a). “Conceptualizing Smart City with Dimensions of Technology, People, and Institutions.” In: Proceedings of the 12th Annual International Digital Government Research Conference: Digital Government Innovation in Challenging Times (pp. 282–291). New York, NY, USA: ACM.
  • Nam, T. and T. A. Pardo. (2011b). “Smart city as urban innovation: Focusing on management, policy, and context.” In: Proceedings of the 5th international conference on theory and practice of electronic governance (pp. 185–194). Washington, DC: ACM.
  • Ojo, A., E. Curry and T. Janowski. (2014). “Designing next Generation Smart City Initiatives - Harnessing Findings and Lessons from a Study of Ten Smart City Programs.” In: ECIS 2014 Pro-ceedings (p. 15). Tel Aviv.
  • Richardson, G. L., B. M. Jackson and G. W. Dickson. (1990). “A principles-based enterprise archi-tecture: Lessons from Texaco and Star enterprise.” MIS Quarterly, 14(4), 385–403.
  • Sethibe, T., J. Campbell and C. McDonald. (2007). “IT governance in public and private sector organisations: examining the differences and defining future research directions.” ACIS 2007 Pro-ceedings, 118.
  • Winter, R. (2014). “Architectural Thinking.” Business & Information Systems Engineering, 6(6), 361–364.
  • Alawadhi, S., & Scholl, H. J. (2016). Smart Governance: A Cross-Case Analysis of Smart City Initiatives. In 2016 49th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS) (pp. 2953–2963). Koloa, HI, USA: IEEE. doi.org/10.1109/HICSS.2016.370

(Sprache: english) SITM-MA-4

Ethnographic Research in Information Systems: State of the Art and Future Research Agenda

Ethnography research is considered to be among the most in-depth research methods available (Myers, 1999). Nevertheless, its usage in the information systems domain has been low to date. This does not mean that there are no studies using ethnography research in information systems, but rather that there is a small amount that has used varying approaches and strategies (Baskerville & Myers, 2015; Prasad, 1997).

Therefore, the purpose of this seminar paper is to develop a state of the art of available scientific literature that applied ethnography research in information systems and provide recommendations for future research agenda. Students are expected to conduct a deep literature analysis and, based on their findings, structure the results carefully so that they can be useful for both research and academia. 

Literatur

  • Baskerville, R. L., & Myers, M. D. (2015). Design ethnography in information systems. Information Systems Journal, 25(1), 23-46.
  • Myers, M. D. (1999). Investigating information systems with ethnographic research. Communications of the Association for Information Systems, 2(1), 23.
  • Prasad, P. (1997). Systems of meaning: Ethnography as a methodology for the study of information technologies. In Information systems and qualitative research (pp. 101-118). Springer, Boston, MA.

(Sprache: english) SITM-MA-5

Sustainability in Project Management: Integration of E-waste Management in IT infrastructure projects

In comparison to other industries, e.g. construction or manufacturing, the significance as well as integration of sustainable waste management measures in projects is a common practice and is widely researched in literature (Khalifeh et al., 2020, p. 1342). Many companies deal with challenges in “applying an internal sustainability perspective to their IT projects” (Woźniak, 2021, p. 26). As an early integration of e-waste management practices in IT projects in terms of reusing old or developing lean hardware can contribute to a significant decrease in e-waste production, there needs to be more attention drawn to sustainability in IT infrastructure projects. 

Therefore, the purpose of this study are two unfold, to provide a summary of the current state of research, and to discuss challenges associated with integrated e-waste management and thereby. As e-waste management is and will also be in future an important and dynamical issue, this study aims to incite scientific researchers to spend even more attention to the role of sustainability in IT infrastructure projects. The findings of this study are not only relevant for researchers, but also for practitioners of IT sector, especially on management level. With regard to the masses of e-waste produced annually, this study likes to encourage stakeholders to rethink their projects and pursue a more sustainable approach.

Literatur

  • Khalifeh, A., Farrell, P., Alrousan, M., Alwardat, S. & Faisal, M. (2020). Incorporating sustainability into software projects: a conceptual framework. International Journal of Managing Projects in Business13(6), 1339–1361. doi.org/10.1108/ijmpb-12-2019-0289
  • Khetriwal, D. S., Kraeuchi, P. & Widmer, R. (2009). Producer responsibility for e-waste management: Key issues for consideration – Learning from the Swiss experience. Journal of Environmental Management90(1), 153–165. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jenvman.2007.08.019
  • Kiddee, P., Naidu, R. & Wong, M. H. (2013). Electronic waste management approaches: An overview. Waste Management33(5), 1237–1250. doi.org/10.1016/j.wasman.2013.01.006
  • Lu, C., Zhang, L., Zhong, Y., Ren, W., Tobias, M., Mu, Z., Ma, Z., Geng, Y. & Xue, B. (2014). An overview of e-waste management in China. Journal of Material Cycles and Waste Management17(1), 1–12. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10163-014-0256-8
  • Patil, R. A. & Ramakrishna, S. (2020). A comprehensive analysis of e-waste legislation worldwide. Environmental Science and Pollution Research27(13), 1–21. doi.org/10.1007/s11356-020-07992-1
  • Ramzan, S., Liu, C. G., Munir, H. & Xu, Y. (2019). Assessing young consumers’ awareness and participation in sustainable e-waste management practices: a survey study in Northwest China. Environmental Science and Pollution Research26(6), 20003–20013. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-019-05310-y
  • Statista. (2020, 13. August). Outlook on global e-waste generation 2019-2030. www.statista.com/statistics/1067081/generation-electronic-waste-globally-forecast/
  • Woźniak, M. (2021). Sustainable Approach in IT Project Management—Methodology Choice vs. Client Satisfaction. Sustainability13(3), 1466. doi.org/10.3390/su13031466

(Sprache: deutsch/englisch) SOFTEC-MA-1 , Betreuer: Barbara Schiller, M. Sc.

Analyse und Abgrenzung von Herausforderungen des Konglomerats Smart City

Viele Städte betreiben bereits Entwicklungsinitiativen hin zu einer Smart City. Durch insbesondere den Einsatz von smarten Produkten zur Informationssammlung und -auswertung, zur Unterstützung bei der Energieverteilung oder dem Notfallschutz, sollen die Städte verbessert werden. Dabei vereint die Domäne viele Ansätze aus anderen „Smart“-Domänen, wie Smart Building oder Smart Energy, und ergänzt sie mit eigenen Konzepten. Dadurch stellt die Domäne ein sehr komplexes Konstrukt dar, dass durch die Kombinierung und Ergänzung zahlreiche Herausforderungen für die Umsetzung beinhaltet.

Ein mögliches Ziel der Arbeit ist es daher, die Herausforderungen herauszuarbeiten und mit Hinblick auf die Zusammenführung verschiedener anderer Domänen voneinander abzugrenzen

Literatur

  • Marrone M, Hammerle M (2018) Smart Cities: A Review and Analysis of Stakeholders’ Literature. Business & Information Systems Engineering 60(3):197–213. doi:10.1007/s12599-018-0535-3 
  • Streitz N (2019) Beyond ‘smart-only’ cities: redefining the ‘smart-everything’ paradigm. Journal of Ambient Intelligence and Humanized Computing 10(2):791–812. doi:10.1007/s12652-018-0824-1 

(Sprache: deutsch/englisch) SOFTEC-MA-2 , Betreuer: Barbara Schiller, M. Sc.

Universal Design oder adaptive Interfaces zur Verbesserung der Accessibility im Kontext von Smart Things – eine kritische Reflektion

Interfaces finden sich heute nicht nur am Computer Monitor oder am Smartphone, sondern zunehmend auch aufgrund der Digitalisierung physischer Gegenstände in verschiedenen anderen Bereichen wieder. Dadurch werden Interfaces durch verschiedene, heterogene Zielgruppen genutzt. Dabei handelt es sich auch zunehmend um (ältere) Menschen mit verschiedenen Einschränkungen, für die bestimmte Interface-Designs, z. B. aufgrund schlechten Sehvermögens, eine Benutzung erschweren oder sogar unmöglich machen. Ziel ist es daher die sogenannte Accessibility (Barrierefreiheit) durch verbessertes Interface-Design zu erhöhen. Die beiden Ansätze „universal Design“ und „adaptive Interfaces“ stellen dabei zwei verschiedene Ansätze dar, die dieses Ziel verfolgen.

Ein Ziel dieser Arbeit besteht daher darin, sich mit beiden Ansätzen kritisch im Kontext der Digitalisierung von physischen Produkten (Smart Things) auseinanderzusetzen und Empfehlungen abzuleiten, wann welcher Ansatz ggf. sinnvoll wäre.

Literatur

  • Edlin-White R, Cobb S, D’Cruz M, Floyde A, Lewthwaite S, Riedel J (2011) Accessibility for Older Users through Adaptive Interfaces: Opportunities, Challenges and Achievements. In: Jacko JA (ed) Human-Computer Interaction. Towards Mobile and Intelligent Interaction Environments. Part III. July 9-14, 2011, Berlin, Heidelberg, pp 483–489. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-21616-9_54 
  • Peissner M, Edlin-White R (2013) User Control in Adaptive User Interfaces for Accessibility. In: Kotzé P, Marsden G, Lindgaard G, Wesson J, Winckler M (eds) Human-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2013. Part I, Berlin, Heidelberg, pp 623–640. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-40483-2_44 
  • Peissner M, Schuller A, Spath D (2011) A Design Patterns Approach to Adaptive User Interfaces for Users with Special Needs. In: Jacko JA (ed) Human-Computer Interaction. Design and Development Approaches. Part I. July 9-14, 2011, Berlin, Heidelberg, pp 268–277. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-21602-2_30 
  • Püschel L, Roeglinger M, Schlott H (2016) What's in a Smart Thing? Development of a Multi-layer Taxonomy. In: ICIS 2016 PROCEEDINGS. 

(Sprache: deutsch/englisch) SOFTEC-MA-3 , Betreuer: Barbara Schiller, M. Sc.

Business Modelle für smarte Produkte – Überblick und kritische Betrachtung bezogen auf verschiedene Anwendungsdomänen

Um aus Unternehmenssicht das Potential smarter Produkte in Bezug auf Kostenminimierung bzw. Gewinnmaximierung auszuschöpfen bedarf es aufgrund der inhärenten Eigenschaften smarter Produkte neue Business Modelle. Die Forschungsliteratur bietet hier bereits erste Ansätze. Dabei bleibt die Frage offen, inwieweit sich diese aufgrund der unterschiedlichen Anforderungen und Stakeholder auf verschiedene Anwendungsdomänen (z. B. Smart Agriculture, Smart Healthcare, Smart Manufacturing, Smart Home) übertragen lassen bzw. wie allgemeingültig diese sind.

Ein mögliches Ziel dieser Arbeit besteht daher darin, sich mit den inhärenten Eigenschaften smarter Produkte auseinanderzusetzen, die neue Business Modelle ermöglichen bzw. benötigen, und entsprechend darauf aufbauend sich mit Ansätzen der Literatur für neue Business Modelle (vergleichend) auseinanderzusetzen vor dem Hintergrund ausgewählter Anwendungsdomänen.

Literatur

  • Fleisch E, Weinberger M, Wortmann F (2015) Business Models and the Internet of Things (Extended Abstract). In: Podnar Žarko I, Pripužić K, Serrano M (eds) Interoperability and Open-Source Solutions for the Internet of Things. International Workshop, FP7 OpenIoT Project, Held in Conjunction with SoftCOM 2014, Cham, pp 6–10. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-16546-2_2 
  • Porter ME, Heppelmann JE (2014) How Smart, Connected Products are Transforming Competition. Harvard Business Review 92(11):64–88
  • Shim JP, Sharda R, French AM, Syler RA, Patten KP (2020) The Internet of Things: Multi-faceted Research Perspectives. Communications of the Association for Information Systems 46:511–536. doi:10.17705/1CAIS.04621 

(Sprache: deutsch/englisch) SOFTEC-MA-4 , Betreuer:Dipl.-Wirt.-Inf. J. Peter M. Schuler

Analyse der Folgen von Diskriminierung durch IT

Sowohl im betrieblichen wie im privaten Kontext sind IT-Systeme allgegenwärtig. Nichtsdestotrotz hat die Gestaltung von IT-Systemen Einfluss darauf wie Stakeholder, die von der Systemnutzung betroffen sind. Teils geht es soweit, dass es sich um Diskriminierung handelt. 

Insbesondere bzgl. Sexismus und Rassismus werden immer wieder Systeme gefunden, die aufgrund ihrer Konzeption oder Nutzung Menschen benachteiligen, seien es Predictive-Policing-Systeme die in der Vergangenheit Afroamerikaner vermehrt zu Unrecht beschuldigten, Algorithmen für virtuelle Hintergründe bei Videokonferenzen die nur bei Personen mit weißer Hautfarbe funktionieren oder Algorithmen für das automatisierte Verwalten von Videokonferenzen mit mehreren gleichzeitig sprechenden Teilnehmern, die überdurchschnittlich häufig Frauen stummschalten.

Ein mögliches Ziel dieser Arbeit wäre die Identifikation und Kategorisierung von Diskriminierungsszenarien und die Analyse der möglichen Folgen durch diese Form der Diskriminierung für Nutzer, Anbieter und Betroffene solcher IT-Lösungen.

Literatur

  • Feine J, Gnewuch U, Morana S, Maedche A (2020) Gender Bias in Chatbot Design. In: Følstad A, Araujo T, Papadopoulos S, Law EL-C, et al. (Hrsg) Chatbot Research and Design. Springer International Publishing, Cham, S 79–93. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-39540-7_6 
  • Hong J-W, Williams D (2019) Racism, responsibility and autonomy in HCI: Testing perceptions of an AI agent. Computers in Human Behavior 100:79–84. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2019.06.012 

(Sprache: deutsch/englisch) SOFTEC-MA-5 , Betreuer:Dipl.-Wirt.-Inf. J. Peter M. Schuler

Analyse von Gestaltungsempfehlungen für IT-Systeme zur Reduktion von Diskriminierung

Sowohl im betrieblichen wie im privaten Kontext sind IT-Systeme allgegenwärtig. Nichtsdestotrotz hat die Gestaltung von IT-Systemen Einfluss darauf wie Stakeholder, die von der Systemnutzung betroffen sind. Teils geht es soweit, dass es sich um Diskriminierung handelt.

Ein Beispiel wäre Diskriminierung im Rahmen einer Personendatenbank bei der die Felder „Geschlecht“ oder „Anrede“ nur zwei Ausprägungsmöglichkeiten haben und damit keine Möglichkeit bieten, eine nichtbinäre Geschlechtsidentität abzubilden. Dabei wird dieses Problem auch dadurch vergrößert, dass solche Daten häufig nur pauschalisiert erhoben werden ohne dass es im Kontext des IT-Systems eine konkrete Anforderung dazu gibt.

Ein mögliches Ziel dieser Arbeit wäre sowohl die Identifikation von Gestaltungsempfehlungen oder Methoden, die geeignet sind bisher nicht beachtete Probleme zu identifizieren, als auch die Identifikation solcher, die konkret erkannten Problemen entgegenwirken.

Literatur

  • Feine J, Gnewuch U, Morana S, Maedche A (2020) Gender Bias in Chatbot Design. In: Følstad A, Araujo T, Papadopoulos S, Law EL-C, et al. (Hrsg) Chatbot Research and Design. Springer International Publishing, Cham, S 79–93. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-39540-7_6 
  • Buchmüller S, Joost G, Bessing N, Stein S (2011) Bridging the gender and generation gap by ICT applying a participatory design process. Personal and Ubiquitous Computing 15(7):743–758. doi:10.1007/s00779-011-0388-y 

(Sprache: deutsch/englisch) SOFTEC-MA-6 , Betreuer:Dipl.-Wirt.-Inf. J. Peter M. Schuler

Anforderung an die Gestaltung von mobilen Applikationen für Menschen mit visuellen Einschränkungen

Die Gestaltung von mobilen Applikationen wird heutzutage durch Frameworks unterstützt. Für die vorherrschenden Plattformen Android und iOS bieten dabei die Hersteller selbst Entwicklungsumgebungen und -frameworks an, um Applikationen zu erstellen. Zusätzlich gibt es eine Reihe von Frameworks, die die plattformunabhängige Entwicklung erlauben: Mit einer Konzeption soll die App sowohl für Android wie iOS generiert werden können.

Während die Entwicklung dieser Apps hinreichend unterstützt wird, wird bei der Konzeption häufig nicht auf Benutzergruppen fokussiert, die visuelle Einschränkungen haben. Dabei dürfte aber gleichwohl naheliegend sein, dass es viele Potenziale in der Smartphone- und App-Benutzung gibt, auch für Menschen mit visuellen Einschränkungen, insb. auch mit stark eingeschränkter Sehfähigkeit oder Blindheit.

Ein Ziel dieser Arbeit könnte sein zu identifizieren, wie die Anforderungen an eine möglichst barrierefreie mobile Applikation sind, etwa in Bezug auf Funktionalität, Inhalt und Darstellung. Darauf aufbauend könnte analysiert werden wie diese Anforderungen durch die bestehenden Frameworks unterstützt werden, wie Applikationen dynamisch auf die Anforderungen eines Benutzers, die beispielsweise im Betriebsystem konfiguriert sind, reagieren können oder welche Methodiken es gibt um die Anforderungen zu ermitteln.

Literatur

  • Krainz E, Miesenberger K, Feiner J (2018) Can We Improve App Accessibility with Advanced Development Methods? In: Miesenberger K, Kouroupetroglou G (Hrsg) Computers Helping People with Special Needs. Springer International Publishing, Cham, S 64–70. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-94277-3_12 
  • Moon H, Cheon J, Lee J, Banda DR, Griffin-Shirley N, Ajuwon PM (2020) Factors influencing the intention of persons with visual impairment to adopt mobile applications based on the UTAUT model. Universal Access in the Information Society. doi:10.1007/s10209-020-00757-0 

(Sprache: deutsch/englisch) UMO-MA-1

Using machine learning approaches to analyze enterprise models—a critical analysis of existing initiatives assessing similarity of models

In the context of possible applications of machine learning in enterprise modeling, among others a question emerges, up to what extent machine learning can help reducing the effort/complexity of enterprise model analysis and maintenance. Especially a promising field seems to be an attempt to analyze enterprise models using machine learning approaches with the aim to identify similar models or models’ fragments. Therefore, the main aim of this seminar paper is to investigate existing approaches using machine learning to assess similarity of (enterprise) models, critically compare them using a created framework, identify reasonable application scenarios, as well as open challenges and future possibilities. 

Literatur

  •  
  • Borozanov V., Hacks S., Silva N. (2019) Using Machine Learning Techniques for Evaluating the Similarity of Enterprise Architecture Models. In: Giorgini P., Weber B. (eds) Advanced Information Systems Engineering. CAiSE 2019. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 11483. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-21290-2_35
  • Dijkman, R., Dumas, M., Van Dongen, B., Käärik, R., Mendling, J.: Similarity of business process models: Metrics and evaluation. Inf. Syst. 36(2), 498–516 (2011)
  • Andreas Schoknecht, Tom Thaler, Peter Fettke, Andreas Oberweis, and Ralf Laue. 2017. Similarity of Business Process Models—A State-of-the-Art Analysis. ACM Comput. Surv. 50, 4, Article 52 (November 2017), 33 pages. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1145/3092694
  • Mu Qiao, Rama Akkiraju, and Aubrey J. Rembert. 2011. Towards efficient business process clustering and retrieval: Com- bining language modeling and structure matching. In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Business Process Management (BPM) (Lecture Notes in Computer Science), Stefanie Rinderle-Ma, Farouk Toumani, and Karsten Wolf (Eds.), Vol. 6896. Springer, 199–214. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-23059-2_17 
  • Monika Malinova, Remco M. Dijkman, and Jan Mendling. 2013a. Automatic extraction of process categories from process model collections. In Proceedings of the Business Process Management Workshops (Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing), Niels Lohmann, Minseok Song, and Petia Wohed (Eds.), Vol. 171. Springer, . DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/ 978- 3- 319- 06257- 0_34 
  • Agnes Koschmider, Michael Fellmann, Andreas Schoknecht, and Andreas Oberweis. 2014. Analysis of process model reuse: Where are we now, where should we go from here? Dec. Supp. Syst. 66 (2014), 9–19. DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dss. 2014.05.012 
  • B. Reitemeyer,  "Automatic Generation of Conceptual Enterprise Models," in 2020 IEEE 24th International Enterprise Distributed Object Computing Workshop (EDOCW), Eindhoven, Netherlands, 2020 pp. 74-79.
  •  

(Sprache: deutsch/englisch) UMO-MA-2

Automated extraction of conceptual models on the example of application of natural language processing in the field of requirements engineering.

Natural language processing (NLP), being one of the subfields of artificial intelligence and linguistics, is, roughly speaking, concerned with machine processing and analyzing large amounts of natural language data. NLP techniques have been applied in numerous scenarios, among others, to extract conceptual models. This is especially visible in the field of requirements engineering (RE), where NLP is applied, e.g., to create ERM or UML models based on user stories. Therefore, the main goal of this seminar paper is to critically investigate the current state of research on the application of NLP to automatically create conceptual models, especially in RE, identify strengths and weaknesses, as well as formulate postulates regarding its further development. 

Literatur

  • Lucassen, G., Robeer, M., Dalpiaz, F. et al. Extracting conceptual models from user stories with Visual Narrator. Requirements Eng 22, 339–358 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00766-017-0270-1
  • Btoush ES, Hammad MM (2015) Generating ER diagrams from requirement specifications based on natural language processing. Int J Database Theory Appl 8(2):61–70
  • Arora C, Sabetzadeh M, Briand L, Zimmer F (2016) Extracting domain models from natural-language requirements: approach and industrial evaluation. In: Proceedings of the ACM/IEEE 19th international conference on model driven engineering languages and systems (MODELS). ACM, pp 250–260
  •  Elbendak, Mosa, Paul Vickers, and Nick Rossiter (2011). “Parsed Use Case Descriptions as a Basis for Object-Oriented Class Model Generation.” Journal of Systems and Software 84 (7): 1209–23. doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2011.02.025. 
  • Vidya Sagar, Vidhu Bhala R., and S. Abirami (2014) “Conceptual Modeling of Natural Language Functional Requirements.” Journal of Systems and Software 88 (1): 25–41. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2013.08.036.
  • Elallaoui, Meryem, Khalid Nafil, and Raja Touahni (2018) “Automatic Transformation of User Stories into UML Use Case Diagrams Using NLP Techniques.”, in Procedia Computer Science, 130:42–49. Elsevier B.V. doi.org/10.1016/j.procs.2018.04.010. 
  • Chetan Arora, Mehrdad Sabetzadeh, Shiva Nejati, and Lionel Briand. 2019. An Active Learning Approach for Improving the Accuracy of Automated Domain Model Extraction. ACM Trans. Softw. Eng. Methodol. 28, 1, Article 4 (January 2019), 34 pages.

(Sprache: deutsch/englisch) UMO-MA-3

“Argumentation Machines”: Software that can reason like a human debater? A Critical Analysis of a New Area of Research in Artificial Intelligence.

The development and assessment of arguments is a hallmark of human reason. So far, no software system can match the performance of a human debater. A new stream of research in AI and linguistics aims at developing machines that are able to discover lines of arguments in natural language representations, develop counter-arguments, and that are even able to challenge a human in a live debate. This term paper serves the assessment of the state of the art of respective research projects. In addition, it should analyze and assess possible use cases and discuss remaining challenges.

Literatur

  •  Hunter, A., Chalaguine, L.A., Czernuszenko, T., Hadoux,E., & Polberg, S. (2019). Towards Computational Persuasion via Natural Language Argumentation Dialogs. KI 2019: 18-33.
  • Le, D. T., Nguyen, C. T., & Nguyen, K. A. (2018). Dave the debater: a retrieval-based and generative argumentative dialog agent. In Proc. of the 5th Workshop on Argument Mining (pp. 121-130).
  • Rach, N., Minker, W., and Ultes, S. (2018d). Handling unknown user arguments in argumentative dialog systems. In Proc. of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference 32 (pp. 1-4)
  • IBM: Project "Debater". www.youtube.com/watch

(Sprache: deutsch/englisch) UMO-MA-4

Socio-materiality, so-what? Background, core ideas, and the potential for IS research

Since its introduction by Orlikowski in the IS literature, the notion of socio-materiality has garnered much debate. A core tenet of socio-materiality is that IT and the organization surrounding it are entangled, challenging the assumption that they are to be viewed as being orthogonal to one another (Orlikowski, 2007; Orlikowski and Scott, 2008, p.461). For one, this is expressed in the notion of “performativity” of technology, whereby descriptions of some organizational universe of discourse do not merely have a descriptive role, but also “enact” the phenomenon they describe. As an example of such performativity, Orlikowski and Scott (2008, p.461) discuss Black-Scholes. While Black-Scholes started out as a descriptive pricing model for options, over time people/algorithms started to act according to the model. Thus, the Black-Scholes pricing model becomes ”enacted” – shaping the very phenomenon (options pricing) it is supposed to describe.

However, while there exists much debate surrounding socio-materiality, its status in IS remains ambivalent. On the one hand, one may argue that the core tenet of socio-materiality – the entanglement of the social and material – allows for actively reflecting upon the neutrality (or rather, lack thereof) of technology in an organizational setting. On the other hand, scholars accuse socio-materiality of introducing “jargon monoxide” – the use of vague academic jargon where perhaps simpler explanations can suffice (Kautz and Jensen, 2013). Also, Hassan (2016) posits that there no unified definition of technology, let alone Information Technology.  This criticism is especially at odds with one of the core motivations behind socio-materiality, namely the observation that in organizational studies “[t]echnology is missing in action” (Orlikowski and Scott, 2008, p. 434). Furthermore, socio-materiality is sometimes treated as an “umbrella-term”, e.g., to emphasize the materiality apparent in approaches like Actor Network Theory (Jones, 2014) rather than providing a concrete theoretic lens for studying IS phenomena.

The aim of this seminar paper is to critically assess the role of socio-materiality in IS research. To this end, you first explore its basic ideas, its application scenarios and extensions. Then, on the basis of a synthesis of the (critical) discussion on socio-materiality, you reflect upon the role that socio-materiality can play in IS research.

Literatur

  • Orlikowski, W. J., & Scott, S. V. (2008). 10 sociomateriality: challenging the separation of technology, work and organization. Academy of Management annals2(1), 433-474.
  • Hassan, N. R. (2016). A brief history of the material in sociomateriality. ACM SIGMIS Database: the DATABASE for Advances in Information Systems47(4), 10-22.
  • Kautz, K., & Jensen, T. B. (2013). Sociomateriality at the royal court of IS: A jester's monologue. Information and Organization23(1), 15-27.
  • Orlikowski, W. J. (2007). Sociomaterial practices: Exploring technology at work. Organization studies28(9), 1435-1448.
  • Orlikowski, W. J. (2010). The sociomateriality of organisational life: considering technology in management research. Cambridge journal of economics34(1), 125-141.
  • Jones, M. (2014). A Matter of Life and Death. Mis Quarterly38(3), 895-A6.

(Sprache: deutsch/englisch) UMO-MA-5

Vorgehensmodelle zur Einführung von Machine Learning in Organisationen vor dem Hintergrund aktueller Herausforderungen

Schenkt man Hersteller- und Presseberichten glauben, so kommen Verfahren des maschinellen Lernens (kurz: ML) in Organisationen immer mehr zum Einsatz. Dieser Einsatz geht dabei mit einigen Herausforderungen einher, die gesellschaftlich kontrovers diskutiert werden und mit Schlagworten wie Transparenz oder Verantwortlichkeit verbunden sind. Demgegenüber stehen Vorgehensmodelle wie CRISP-DM, welche den Einsatz von ML in Organisationen anleiten sollen indem sie u.a. bestimmte Aktivitäten vorschlagen, die für einen erfolgreichen Einsatz zu beachten sind. Mit dieser Seminararbeit werden Sie gebeten zu untersuchen wie weit ausgewählte Vorgehensmodelle auf aktuelle Herausforderungen explizit eingehen oder aufzuzeigen wo sich Bezugspunkte wenigstens argumentativ herstellen lassen (implizit). Zu diesem Zweck sind anhand eines Hauptkapitels aktuelle Herausforderungen beim Einsatz von ML in Organisationen zu thematisieren, bevor in einem weiteren Kapitel ausgewählte Vorgehensmodelle zur Einführung von ML vorgestellt und vor dem Hintergrund der von Ihnen identifizierten Herausforderungen diskutiert werden. Die Arbeit kann dabei auf bestimmte organisatorische Herausforderung wie bspw. im Rahmen der Personalbeschaffung (Bogen 2018) oder bestimmte Formen des maschinellen Lernens (bspw. Convolutional Neural Networks) fokussiert werden.

Literatur

  • Bogen, M., & Rieke, A. (2018). Help wanted: An examination of hiring algorithms, equity, and bias.
  • Burrell, J. (2016). How the machine ‘thinks’: Understanding opacity in machine learning algorithms. Big Data & Society, 3(1), 2053951715622512.
  • Goodman, B., & Flaxman, S. (2017). European Union regulations on algorithmic decision-making and a “right to explanation”. AI magazine, 38(3), 50-57.
  • Jöhnk, J., Weißert, M., & Wyrtki, K. (2021). Ready or Not, AI Comes—An Interview Study of Organizational AI Readiness Factors. Business & Information Systems Engineering, 63(1), 5-20.
  • Kurgan, L. A., & Musilek, P. (2006). A survey of knowledge discovery and data mining process models. Knowledge Engineering Review, 21(1), 1-24.
  • Schwaiger, R., & Steinwendner, J. (2020). Neuronale Netze programmieren mit Python. Rheinwerk Computing. Kapitel 11
  • Van Eck, M. L., Lu, X., Leemans, S. J., & Van Der Aalst, W. M. (2015, June). PM²: a process mining project methodology. In International Conference on Advanced Information Systems Engineering (pp. 297-313). Springer, Cham.